65 sq. meters of sailcloth for the new Ladby Ship

24. March 2014 | 65 sq. meters of sailcloth for the new Ladby Ship

The Vikings were known far and wide for their trailblazing navigation skills. That's why the big sail for the one-to-one reconstruction of the Ladby Ship is so important. The 65 sq. meters of sailcloth to be used for the sail has now arrived at the Viking Museum at Ladby, and during the coming year, volunteers from the Sail & Rig group will be dying the cloth blue and gold, sewing the sail and attaching rope to it. The finished sail will sport blue and gold vertical stripes!

The purchase of sailcloth and other materials for the sail is part of the reconstruction project to build a full-scale copy of the Ladby Ship, funded by the Augustinus Foundation.This work has been underway since the summer of 2011, with the help of 35 volunteers. In early 2014, a group of experts in dying with plants gathered together, and on the basis of their recommendations, the dying of the linen sailcloth will soon begin. You can follow the sailmaking process throughout 2014 at the museum.

Bytoften

Visit an iron age village in Langeskov.

 

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Iron Age

Calendar

Launching the Ladby Dragon
Thursday, April 26, 2018, 4:00-8:00 PM
The Viking Museum at Ladby

Now the Ladby Dragon is ready for another season on the water!

News

The mast has been raised on the Ladby Dragon
26. September 2017
The Viking Museum at Ladby

Now the reconstructed Ladby Ship has been fitted out with mast and rigging.

We will soon expand the Viking Museum
26. September 2017
The Viking Museum at Ladby

With the newly acquired acreage (4.5 hectares, or 11.1 acres) at our disposal, we can now improve accessability, expand our teaching facilities and make the museum an even better place for an outing.

The Sword Bead from Munkebo Hill was a Showpiece
26. September 2017
Landscape & Archaeology

A proud and a wealthy Viking must have owned the sword that had a sword bead on it, which was found in connection with the excavations on Munkebo Hill.

In the Iron Age, they made iron at Selleberg
26. September 2017
Landscape & Archaeology

Two bloomeries (smelting furnaces) from ca. 200 AD were found between Marslev and Birkende.